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Agenda w desc September 28
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MPHA/MEHA 2016 Annual Conference and Meeting Agenda– Wednesday, September 28, 2016
(click on title of presentation to be taken to a description)

7:30 am – 5:00 pm

Registration

8:00 am - 9:00 am

Maurice Hilleman and Vaccines: A Montana Story  

 Mark Jutila BS, MS and PhD  

9:00 am - 9:15 am

Transition Break

9:15 am - 10:15 am

Professional Development Strategies & Considerations: Communication 
Marci Buckles BSW

 

 Infection Control and Prevention
Hillary Hanson MS, MPH, CPH 

Presentations 101 (one of a two hour skill building session) 

Julie Benson-Rosston

10:15 am - 11:15 am

Refreshments, Visit Exhibitors, Visit Posters, Roundtables and Network with Your Colleagues

11:15 am - 12:15pm

Professional Development Strategies & Considerations: Time Management 
Marci Buckles BSW

Implementing A Cardiac Care System in Montana 
Janet Trethewey EdD

Presentations 101 (two of a two part skill building session) 
Julie Benson-Rosston

12:15 pm- 1:15 pm

MPHA Business Meeting 
        MEHA Business Meeting
          

1:15 pm - 2:15pm

Professional Development Strategies and Considerations: Emotional Intelligence and Stress Management

Marci Buckles MSW

Using Geography to Connect People and
Tell a Story

Jessie Fernandez MPH, CPH and 
Dorota Carpenedo MPH

 We Can't do it Alone ..Building
Inter-professional Partnerships

Elizabeth Kinion Ed.D. MSN, BSN, RN Fellow American Academy of Nursing 

2:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Transition Break- Silent Auction Ends

2:45 pm - 3:45pm

Achieving Health Equity: Tools for a National Campaign Against Racism

Camara Jones MD, MPH, PhD
President American Public Health Association



 


 

2016 MPHA/MEHA Annual Business Meeting and Conference- Descriptions of Keynotes and Breakouts- September 28, 2016

8:00 – 9:00 am Keynote

Maurice Hilleman and vaccines: a Montana story - Mark Jutila BS, MS and PhD

Maurice Hilleman grew up in Miles City, went to college at Montana State University (Montana State College at the time), received his PhD from the University of Chicago and went on to a long and successful career as a virologist and the world's leading vaccinologist. He developed 40 vaccines over his lifetime, including the majority of the 14 childhood vaccines, many still in use today. His vaccines are credited for saving 10's of millions of people worldwide. This presentation will cover the background on vaccines, and Maurice's impact on vaccine development and his contributions to other areas of biomedical science.

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Public Health Science
 


 

9:15 – 10:15 am sessions        

 Professional Development Strategies & Considerations: Communication - Marci Buckles BSW

 Since communication is such a huge part of our lives, it is important to include it as a topic when discussing professional skills. There are strategies you can enlist to improve your communication, but this requires taking some time to determine what our own communication strengths and challenges are. Once you have an understanding of how communication differences can lead to conflict in the workplace, you will be more effective at recognizing how to bridge those communication gaps before they lead to conflict.

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Leadership and Systems Thinking 

The Role of the Local and State Health Department in Healthcare-Associated Infection Control and Prevention - Hillary Hanson MS, MPH, CPH

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that each year over 700,000 healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur in the United States. These HAIs result in lost lives and increased healthcare costs. To stress the importance of this topic Healthy People 2020 identified healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) as a national objective and the CDC identified the elimination of HAIs as a Winnable Battle. To date the involvement of local health departments in Montana on this topic has been sparse. However, new proposed federal rules may push health departments to take a more active role. The new proposed federal rule changes would require long term care facilities to designate an Infection Prevention and Control Officer and have a system for preventing, identifying, reporting, investigation and control of infections. While this sounds like a good plan on paper the logistics of this will be overwhelming and local health departments may be called upon to provide expertise. Recently the National Association of County City Health Officials released funding to build HAI capacity in local health departments. The Flathead City-County Health Department received one of the grants and is working to increase expertise in HAI through training, national infection control certification and collaborating with the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services. This presentation will introduce the work being completed by both the Flathead City-County Health Department and the Department of Public Health and Human Services in relation to HAIs. In addition, the presentation will present ideas for how other local health departments can begin to take an active role in HAI prevention. 

Core Competencies for Public Health: 
Policy Development/Program Planning 
Public Health Science

Presentations 101- Julie Benson-Rosston  

This presentation will enhance your public speaking skills, in order to (1) effectively inform your communities and (2)advocate for your programs. Topics include: preparing for your audience, managing your nervousness, incorporating technology, improving your delivery skills, and managing questions. 

Core Competencies for Public Health: 
Communication 


 

11:15 am – 12:15 pm sessions

Professional Development Strategies & Considerations: Time Management - Marci Buckles BSW

Time is the most precious resource there is. We can’t buy it, we all become stressed when we don’t think we have enough of it and yet no one is perfect at utilizing every single second. Effective time managers are more resilient to the stress faced each day and become less overwhelmed when crisis occur. 
This Interactive workshop offers practical information and individual assessment to determine areas for personal and professional growth. Information can be utilized for assisting growth of staff as well. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Leadership and Systems Thinking

Implementing a Cardiac Care System in the State of Montana - Janet Trethewey EdD

Survival from Cardiac Arrest requires the activation of the Cardiac Chain of Survival and having every link in the chain be complete and connected to the next. Failure of a link, or even having a weak link, will result in poor outcomes for the patient. Creating a strong Cardiac Chain of Survival requires a commitment by the entire community to become prepared for such an emergency.
Currently only 5-8% of people who suffer from a cardiac arrest survive! Only 1/3 of people who suffer an out-of-hospital arrest receive bystander CPR and >80% of all cardiac arrests happen at home or at work, not in a hospital. Even with these dismal statistics, we see pockets of hope. Currently, in Gallatin County (the greater Bozeman area) if someone has a cardiac arrest, 62% of the time someone starts bystander CPR. Survival from a cardiac arrest in that area is close to 25% - 5 times the national average. 
How is that possible? The communities in the area have worked hard over the past three years strengthening each link in the Cardiac Chain of Survival. They have work to go and are shooting for a 50% survival rate. Every community in Montana can improve their survival rates; rural areas as well as more urban areas can make changes to increase the chances of survival. 
This presentation will talk about the Cardiac Ready Communities Program, what strategies and systems are being implemented and what assessment tools are being developed and applied to measure change within a community and across the state. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Policy Development/Program Planning 
Leadership and Systems Thinking 


1:15 -2:15 pm sessions

Professional Development Strategies & Considerations: Emotional Intelligence and Stress Management - Marci Buckles MSW

Daniel Goleman first brought ‘emotional intelligence’ to a wide audience with his 1995 book of that name. He found that while the qualities traditionally associated with leadership such as intelligence, toughness, determination and vision are required for success, they are insufficient. Exceptional leaders — those who are respected and admired by both their team and upper management — not only have hard skills and technical expertise, they have "softer" skills that they put to use every day. 
*They are emotionally intelligent.
*They understand stress management and 
*They lead by example. 
This interactive workshop offers practical information and individual assessment to determine areas for personal and professional growth. Information can be utilized for assisting growth of staff as well. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Leadership and Systems Thinking 

Using Geography to Connect People and Tell a Story- Jessie Fernandez MPH, CPH and Dorota Carpenedo MPH

This presentation will focus on the use of geography and geographic information systems (GIS) to explain public health messages and tell a story. Presenters will describe the use of story maps, examples of communicating information using location as well as examples of spatial analysis to describe disease burden or risk. Four different examples will be given from the Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Bureau. The Community Resource Map is an interactive map to help people identify what chronic disease prevention/control programs are available in their area. The Asthma Control Program’s success story map tells about personal and programmatic successes with asthma control in different Montanan’s lives. The Diabetes Program story map tells describes the burden of diabetes and where and what is being done to control it. Finally, the Tobacco Story Map describes the issue with point of sale tobacco marketing, describing the burden and the risk to youth in different locations in the state. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Analytic/Assessment 
Communication 

We Can’t do it Alone ... Building Inter-professional Partnerships​- Elizabeth Kinion Ed.D. MSN, BSN, RN Fellow American Academy of Nursing 

Client- Inter-professional client-centered care requires collaboration among clients, nurses, and other health professionals who work together at the individual, organizational and health-care system levels. Health professionals’ work together to optimize the health and wellness of clients and involve the client in decision-making. Clients are actively engaged in the prevention, promotion and management of their health. What does this mean for Public Health Nurses?  Key principles for success include Inter-professional Communication, Patient/Client/Family/Community Centered Care, Role Clarification, Team Functioning, Collaborative Leadership and Interpersonal Conflict.

Interprofessional Collaboration:  Public health is emerging as a trans-disciplinary field that integrates public health concepts and functions with healthcare delivery and clinical care of the individual.  This requires the courage to lead for change, to use an evidence-based approach for decision-making, and have the skills to move political, organizational, and individual behavior. Not a small task!

When considering the traditional values of public health two that come to mind are service and interdisciplinary cooperation. The concept of “servant leader” characterizes many leaders across the spectrum of health organizations, including public health. We are challenged to consider putting the collective wellbeing ahead of personal gain. This health care priority that today requires careful consideration. What does this mean for Public Health Nurses?    

The following brief overview of the Inter-Professional competencies will guide our conversation today. We will consider Inter-professional communication, patient/client/family/community centered care, role clarification, team functioning, collaborative leadership and interpersonal conflict.

1.            Interprofessional Communication:  Public health is emerging as a trans-disciplinary field that integrates public health concepts and functions with healthcare delivery and clinical care of the individual. The courage to push for change, an evidence-based approach to decision-making, and the skills to move political, organizational, and individual behavior

2.            The traditional values of public health include service and interdisciplinary cooperation. The concept of “servant leader” characterizes many leaders of health organizations, including public health. Putting collective wellbeing ahead of personal gain is a priority that today can be measured as well as espoused.

3.            Leaders are people with Vision – they see a future different than the status quo. They have Influence to drive change – they are able to communicate their vision and win others over to embrace and implement it. In addition, leaders are grounded in values.

4.            Communication:  Understanding and respecting team member’s roles. Understanding that primary health leaders are recognize that teamwork requires work. Having the practical know-how for sharing patient care and managing a common patient.

5.            Role Clarification: Understanding own role and the role of other and explain it to others so that they understand your role.  Use the knowledge appropriately.to achieve patient goals.

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Leadership and Systems Thinking

 


   

2:45 – 3:45 pm Keynote

Achieving Health Equity: Tools for a National Campaign Against Racism- Camara Jones MD, MPH, PhD, President American Public Health Association

Dr. Jones presents a Cliff Analogy for understanding three dimensions of health intervention: providing health services, addressing the social determinants of health (including poverty and neighborhood conditions), and addressing the social determinants of equity (including racism and other systems of structured inequity). She then turns her focus to a discussion of racism as a social determinant of equity and a root cause of “racial”/ethnic differences in health outcomes. Dr. Jones defines racism as “a system of structuring opportunity and assigning value based on the social interpretation of how one looks (which is what we call ‘race’), that unfairly disadvantages some individuals and communities, unfairly advantages other individuals and communities, and saps the strength of the whole society through the waste of human resources.” She identifies three levels of racism (institutionalized, personally-mediated, and internalized) and illustrates these three levels with her Gardener’s Tale allegory. She then generalizes her discussion of racism to encompass other systems of structured inequity. Dr. Jones describes the International Convention on the Elimination of all forms of Racial Discrimination as an organizing tool for addressing the impacts of racism on the health and well-being of our nation. She closes with three additional allegories on “race” and racism to equip attendees to name racism, ask “How is racism operating here?”, and organize and strategize to act. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:
Communication
Cultural Compentency
Leadership and Systems Thinking




 

 

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