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2017 MPHA Annual Conference and Meeting
Agenda September 20, 2017

Click on title to be taken to a description of the presentation and presenters
6:45 - 7:45 AM  Leadership Breakfast Meeting
8:00 - 9:00 AM   Leaving a Legacy- Chad Hymas
 9:00 -9:15 AM  Transition Break
9:15 - 10:15 AM  Wrapped in Hope:  A community collaborative to address substance abuse in pregnancy  Data Rocks!  How to find, understand, and use local public health data The Impact of Community Participation on the Implementation of Prevention Programs
10:15 - 11:15 AM  Poster Presentations
11:15 - 12:15 AM   Electronic Cigarettes:
Their Impact on Montana Youth
  Data Rocks (cont)  Social and Clinical Considerations of Substance Abuse
12:15 - 1:15 PM  MPHA Business Mtg
1:15 - 2:15 PM  Montana Metrics:  Measuring and Moving the Dial on Local and Tribal Public Health Capacity  Building a Community Health Map: Integrating Health Equity and Technology

Understanding, Recognizing, and Serving Victims of SUDs (Substance Use Disorders)

2:15 - 2:45 PM  Silent Auction Ends
2:45 - 3:45 PM  Overview of 2017 Montana State Health Assessment (SHA) and new 2018 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) Priorities  "Win, Win, Win" -  Wins for community health, design and the environment  The Impact of Adolescent Sexting in Frontier Communities

2017 MPHA/MEHA Annual Business Meeting and Conference- Descriptions of Keynotes and Breakouts- September 20, 2017

8:00 – 9:00 AM Keynote

Leaving a Legacy- Chad Hymas Motivational Speaker

A motivating presentation must be accompanied with solutions that change and inspire lives. Today more than ever, people are looking not simply for entertainment, but for direction and solid answers. Chad Hymas has spent the last ten years developing solutions that transformed his life. His stories are moving, his courage unprecedented, and his insights . . . profound. His accomplishments provide a powerful litmus test to the validity of these dynamic principles! In this presentation Chad will teach your group to:

Conquer the emotional paralysis that robs vision and momentum.
Turn obstacles into incredible opportunities.
Harness the power of change and rise above to progress.
Tap into unseen personal power and inner strength to accomplish seemingly impossible dreams! 

Objectives:

To change obstacles into incredible opportunities
To uncover unseen personal power and inner strength to accomplish seemingly impossible dreams!
To recognize the power of change and rise above to progress 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Leadership and Systems Thinking


9:15 – 10:15 AM Breakouts  

Data Rocks! How to find, understand, and use local public health data- Lisa Schmidt, Heather Zimmerman, Cody Custis, Hallie Koeppen  Epidemiologists

We will first present some general information for major sources of local public health data including: Vital Statistics, the American Community Survey, County Health Rankings, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, and Montana Central Tumor Registry. This information will include the strengths and weakness of each source, how to access the data, and how to interpret the data. We will also cover some general data interpretation topics such as what do confidence intervals tell you, what does a rate mean, and why we need to be concerned about small numbers.

The second half of the presentation will be hands on. We will ask participants to bring a laptop to the training (that can access the Internet) and work on finding some data that would be helpful to them in their work. During this time the presenters will be available for help as participants experience difficulties. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation?  Learners will go away with increased knowledge on where to find local public health data. They will understand to advantages and limitations of different data sources and they will understand how to correctly interpret different types of data, including rates, prevalence estimates, and confidence intervals. 

Why are these lessons important?  These are important lessons for participants to learn because data is necessary for designing, implementing, and evaluating public health prevention programs. Participants need to know how to find, interpret, and communicate data successfully in order to develop effective prevention strategies. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Learners will receive two handouts. One will list local public health data sources with respective websites and contact information. The other will describe commonly used data terms and definitions

Objective(s):

To describe how to access major sources of public health data at the local level
To describe how to interpret rates and confidence intervals 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Analytic/Assessment
Communication 

The Impact of Community Participation on the Implementation of Prevention Programs- Erica McKeon-Hanson Director, Little River Institute at Montana State University-Northern

Sponsored by the MPHA Public Health Nurse Section

his presentation is designed to give public health professionals strategies for engaging their own communities in the implementation of prevention programs. Many public health agencies, especially in the rural Montana, are short staffed with a limited budget making the design and implementation of prevention practices challenging. Community participation can play a valuable and integral role in building community capacity that ultimately support a bottom-up approach to implementation. A case study of a community-based participatory research project and subsequent prevention program carried out in a rural Montana American Indian reservation community will be explored. Attendees will gain tools to engage their community members in the identification of priority community health needs and support community participation in the design and implementation of prevention programs. Active discourse and dialogue will be encouraged throughout the presentation session with activities to explore community participation methods for use within their own communities. Community capacity and empowerment is key to the success of prevention program implementation. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation? Attendees will learn methods to engage their community members in the identification of priority community health needs and support community participation in the design and implementation of prevention programs

Why are these lessons important?  The importance is to build community capacity for the implementation of prevention programs. Adequate community capacity and participation can reduce the resources expended within public health agencies while ensuring success of prevention programs. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Learners will gain practical methods of promoting participatory activities in their communities and tools for creating a bottom-up (community capacity building) approach to the design and implementation of prevention programs that address priority health problems. 

Objective(s):

To identify practical tools that ensure greater success for building community capacity in the design and implementation of prevention programs.

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Analytic/Assessment
Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication
Cultural Competency
Community Dimensions of Practice

Wrapped in Hope: A community collaborative to address substance abuse in pregnancy- Cara Harrop MD, Jamie Straub DO and LeeAnna Muzquiz MD

Wrapped in Hope is a community collaboration between two local critical access hospitals, Lake County Public Health, CSKT Health and Polson Health to address the growing crisis of substance abuse in pregnancy. After collecting data about the prevalence of the problem in Lake county, a collection of representatives from each entity came together, putting aside institutional affiliation, to design a program aimed at providing integrated substance abuse counseling, mental health services and primary care in the bigger context of community social services to women and families affected by substance abuse during pregnancy. The consortium has developed a public messaging campaign, addressed knowledge gaps in the provider community and created a successful collaboration integrating the services available in our community. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation
1. Collaboration in community health can work
2. Integration of behavioral health and substance abuse treatment in primary care settings is successful.
3. Substance abuse in pregnancy has profound health and financial consequences for communities. 

Why are these lessons important? The focus on value in healthcare and the emphasis on community health has shifted the focus of care from the health care provider's office to an interdisciplinary, cross-organizational framework made successful by effective care coordination. This framework for care delivery has the potential to achieve real, sustainable savings in the health care system. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Learners will have the framework to design similar collaborative projects in their communities to address relevant health care issues. 

Objective(s):
1. To provide a framework for construction of a community collaborative
2. To identify necessary values for achieving success in community health care initiatives
3. To develop a framework for understanding the implications of substance abuse in pregnancy.
4. To value a model for integrated primary care in a rural community setting using Wrapped in Hope as an example to address substance abuse in pregnancy.

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication
Community Dimensions of Practice
Leadership and Systems Thinking


11:15 AM – 12:15 PM Breakouts

Electronic Cigarettes: Their Impact on Montana Youth- Kris Minard Montana Office of Public Instruction Tobacco Use Prevention Education Specialist

Is vaping the new “cool” thing to do? Youth electronic cigarette use has increased dramatically in the US, but it has "exploded" in Montana. The FDA has "deemed" these electronic devices to be tobacco products, but when it comes to implementing and enforcing regulations....the train has left the station and we are running to catch up.
This interactive presentation might surprise you with examples of how and why vaping has taken our country by storm. It will include videos and actual samples of a wide variety of electronic cigarettes and their accoutrements. We will discuss and assess the cost benefit ratio between the potential for good (e.g. fewer deaths from tobacco use) and harm. (e.g. youth nicotine addiction/gateway to combustible tobacco/unknown health risks.) Strategies to prevent and reduce youth use will be highlighted. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation
Learn about the prevalence of Montana youth electronic cigarette use
Gain insight into how nicotine effects the adolescent brain
Become familiar with tobacco industry marketing tactics – revisited
Have an opportunity to view a variety of these new-fangled electronic products
Learn about what Montana public schools are doing to prevent student E-cig use 

Why are these lessons important?  Prevention is key to nicotine addiction in youth. If you don't know what you're up against, you've lost the battle

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey data, a better understanding of the world of vaping, access to tobacco use prevention resources

Objective(s):

To evaluate the impact of electronic cigarettes on Montana youth and be able to identify at least one potential mitigating factor. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication

Social and Clinical Considerations of Substance Abuse- Ike Jesse Training Development Specialist

Sponsored by the MPHA Public Health Nurse Section

The concerns of substance abuse have created substantial health and safety risks in the communities of Montana. Children in these communities have become more and more vulnerable to health concerns due to the environmental exposures to illicit drugs and violence in their homes and communities. This presentation will provide information regarding involvement of Child and Family Services Division (CFSD) with the public health community in relation to Mandatory Reporting requirements and the effects of drugs and drug use on Montana children. The background information regarding the number of children in Montana involved in CFSD cases involving substance abuse and mandated reported should provide a basis for those attending to gain a better understanding of how the public health community is a vital piece in the struggle to combat the exposure of Montana's children to substance abuse and related social issues. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation?  The requirements of mandated reporting and the potential civil liabilities associated with non-compliance with mandated reporting statutes

Why are these lessons important?  Knowing the requirements for mandated reporting in the public health community can greatly decrease the possibility of facing civil liability for failing to report when mandated. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Information is key. Having the information to understand and recognize the dangers of substance abuse to the children in the State of Montana will assist all in attendance with fully understanding the need to report concerns to the CFSD hotline. All attendees will receive the specific contact information for Centralized Intake, as well as the necessary information to have available to provide to Centralized Intake upon reporting. 

Objectives:

Garner a better understanding of the hazards Montana children face surrounding substance abuse.

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication 

Data Rocks! How to find, understand, and use local public health data (cont)


1:15 - 2:15 PM Breakouts

Building a Community Health Map: Integrating Health Equity and Technology- Mary McCourt and Mike Snook Geographical Information Systems Manager

This session will provide information on the development and implementation of the Missoula Community Health Map. This is a collaborative project of the Missoula City-County Health Department, Missoula County, and the City of Missoula. The map was inspired by Missoula's Invest Health planning grant awarded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and Reinvestment Fund. The map provides the interpretation and analysis of patterns and trends by presenting a visual context on the relationship between obesity, mental health, and the physical environment, with an emphasis on low-wealth neighborhoods, in keeping with the focus of Invest Health. Today's speakers will talk about the collaboration process, as well as how we can use the data to identify ways to strengthen and accelerate our efforts to create healthy places for all Missoula residents to live, work, and play. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation? Participants will be able to learn how to collect neighborhood, city, and county level health, housing, and environmental data. Participants will learn how a community health map can be used as a public health prevention and intervention tool with policy, systems, and structural change strategies.

Why are these lessons important?   City and neighborhood trend data is difficult to access. Much of the data is reported on a county level for a particular point in time. We do have local data that provides valuable information on chronic disease health outcomes and livability in Missoula’s three lowest-wealth neighborhoods. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? The ability to apply health and environmental data into a GIS mapping tool to share with community stakeholders groups for the development of health equity in policy, planning, structural and systematic programs over the long haul. 

Objective(s):

1. Describe at least two data sources that can be used to advance health equity and community health in your community.
2. Identify how a community health map can be tailored for their communities.
3. List three stakeholder groups to include in the program planning of a community health map and implementing prevention and interventions with vulnerable groups. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning
Community Dimensions of Practice
Public Health Science
Leadership and Systems Thinking

Montana Metrics: Measuring and Moving the Dial on Local and Tribal Public Health Capacity- Ellen Leahy RN, MN, MPH

Assisted by the Montana Public Health Association and the Association of Montana Public Health Officials, Ellen Leahy of the Missoula City-County Health Department and Kerry Pride of the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services created a Montana-sized tool to measure local and tribal public health jurisdictions' capacity to deliver the essential public health services and their engagement with the accreditation process. Initial results presented a first-time picture of Montana's frontier state in relation to Public Health Accreditation Board standards for practice. The second year results are in, revealing clear patterns of our state's ability to strengthen our public health capacity. The initial research was guided by Professor Golbeck of the University of Montana and assisted by many of our colleagues. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation?   From a local perspective, Montana is primarily a frontier state -- a reality that invites the opinion that accreditation may be out of reach for most jurisdictions. Rather than view accreditation as an all or nothing proposition, however, the researchers learned that measuring the capacity of local and tribal jurisdictions, in accordance with PHAB standards, was a necessary first step to understanding then moving our state. Second-year data confirms the worth of the approach. 

Why are these lessons important? Local and tribal jurisdiction, regardless of their engagement with formal accreditation, has the opportunity to self-assess and strengthen at least one of its essential public health services using this tool and the PHAB standards. This can be done with a small amount of funding, a cohort-type approach, and the peer-to-peer support that is so fundamental to Montana's local and tribal public health culture.  

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Learners will see where their jurisdiction is in comparison to other of Montana's local jurisdictions and may identify steps to improve their capacity accordingly. This knowledge can be used to advocate for policy-maker support as needed to progress. 

Objective(s):

 To describe:
1) The overall characteristics of Montana's local and tribal public health jurisdictions in relation to PHAB standards for the essential services of public health and engagement with accreditation; 2) Use the survey too to self-assess their jurisdiction and choose an improvement project; 3) Monitor the state's progress each year by referencing the annually-collected data. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Analytic/Assessment
Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication
Public Health Science
Leadership and Systems Thinking

Understanding, Recognizing, and Serving Victims of SUDs (Substance Use Disorders)- Laira Fonner Psychiatric RN at Pathways Treatment Center

Sponsored by the MPHA Public Health Nurse Section

The US Dept of Health and Human Services has declared a public health epidemic due to opioid abuse and rising fatalities due to overdose. Additionally, methamphetamine use and abuse continues to be a concern in Montana. How can we better understand Substance Use Disorders and how to serve our patient population suffering from these disorders? What are current trends of substance use and abuse in our states? How can we recognize use and abuse? What options are there for these vulnerable populations for treatment? What is the physiology of addiction and how effective are common methods of treatment including methadone prescriptions and inpatient treatment? These topics and more will be discussed as well as new ways of viewing addiction and promising new treatment options.

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation? Caregivers who serve this patient population need to be updated on current treatment options and trends in order to better serve patient populations suffering from SUDs. Additionally, understanding SUDs helps reduce stigma and reinforce compassion.

Why are these lessons important? SUDs are complicated and there are no easy solutions. The lack of services for victims of SUDs heightens this frustration and caregivers often feel hopeless treating these patients. Updates on treatment options and effectiveness should be ongoing.

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Resources on best treatment options including prescription as well as in and outpatient treatment options, and services provided in Montana to treat SUDs will be discussed.

Objective(s): To increase your understanding of SUDs (patients and loved ones) and remain informed and compassionate care providers

Core Competencies for Public Health

Analytic/Assessment
Communication Cultural Competency
Community Dimensions of Practice
Public Health Science
Leadership and Systems Thinking




2:45 - 3:45 PM Breakouts

Overview of 2017 Montana State Health Assessment (SHA) and new 2018 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) Priorities- Laura Williamson  Montana State Epidemiologist

An overview of the drafted 2017 State Health Assessment (SHA) and 2018 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) priorities will be provided. The presentation will describe the health status of Montanan’s. The new health areas, which the 2018 SHIP will focus on, and evidence-based public health action to make change on these priorities will be discussed.

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation?  Learners will be able to describe the leading health issues facing Montanans, as well as describe the new priorities identified for the 2018 SHIP. Learners will also be able to identify how their organization can get involved to implement evidence-based action to improve the health related to the health priority areas. 

Why are these lessons important?  These lessons will give an overview of the current health status of Montana with the vision that the data-driven health priorities will enable Montana public health partners to collaborate towards improving the health of Montanans. Learners will have the opportunity to provide feedback on the 2017 SHA and 2018 SHIP. They will also have the opportunity to identify ways their organization can participate in implementing evidence-based public health action. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Learners will be able to participate throughout the five-year implementation of the SHIP by providing input or participating in a priority work group. They can work with their organizations to implement programs based on the health data presented. 

Objective(s):

To increase their awareness of the health status and associated risk factors of Montana. Participants will also increase their awareness of identified issues found within the State Health Assessment and the 2018 State Health Improvement Priorities

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Analytic/Assessment
Policy Development/Program Planning
Cultural Competency
Community Dimensions of Practice 

The Impact of Adolescent Sexting in Frontier Communities- Jennifer Fladager RN, BS Chemistry, BA Speech and Theatre

This cross-sectional study was designed to understand adolescent sexting behavior in Dawson County, Montana and to determine possible interventions to reduce the incidence of this behavior.
Methods: Two surveys were developed to collect local perceptions about adolescent sexting. One survey was for parents of children in grades 6 through 12 and the other was for students in grades 7 through 12. Surveys were administered from September 16th to September 30, 2015 to the 7th through 10th grade classes at Washington Middle School and Dawson County High School in Glendive, MT. The parents’ survey was administered on social media and in-person at local events.
Findings: The survey was administered to 416 adolescents in grades 7–12 with 71% average completion rate (61-85%). The average estimated sexting rate for grades 7–12 was 36.10% (2.7%–41.86%). Results suggested adolescents who spent 3 or more hours daily on a smartphone appeared more likely to sext than a teen who spent less than 1 hour daily on a smartphone. Regular parental monitoring was found to reduce the behavior. The response rate for the parental survey was 8%, and was not used in the study.
Conclusions: Most adolescents surveyed understood the potential adverse effects of teen sexting, but sexting rates remain high. Study findings indicate parental monitoring is key to reducing or eliminating the behavior. Findings also suggested restricting time adolescents use a smart phone to one hour daily might reduce the incidence of sexting. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation?  Sexting (the act of sending or receiving sexually suggestive or explicit texts and photos) has an impact on the developing adolescent social structure and mental health. In Dawson County, a number of cases were tied to illegal activity. The interventions used there may be useful to other jurisdictions struggling with the same issue. 

Why are these lessons important?  Cyberbullying is becoming a leading concern, especially with the connections to teen suicide. When the cyberbullying is of a sexual nature, or tied to other acts such as statutory rape, molestation, and exploitation of children, the effects are long lasting in the affected individual's life. Prevention of this issue takes a number of partners, and could ultimately avoid a tragedy for families and Montana communities. 

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Attendees will learn the drivers of the behavior, interventions that may be effective, and communication techniques with the public

Objective(s):

To understand the drivers of the behavior, interventions that may be effective, and communication techniques with the public

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Analytic/Assessment
Community Dimensions of Practice
Public Health Science 

Win, Win, Win" - Wins for community health, design and the environment- Karen Lane M.Ed.

In 2015 the Healthy Communities Coalition coordinated by Lewis and Clark Public Health was awarded a Plan4Health grant to create an active living wayfinding system and communication plan. The Greater Helena Area Long Range Transportation Plan had recommended a uniform signage system for the community. The system will guide people regardless of income, ability or age to opportunities for physical activity and nutritious food.
The grant was awarded by the American Public Health Association and the American Planning Association with the endorsement of the local affiliate Montana Public Health Association and the Western Central Chapter of the American Planning Association. It was an important opportunity to work more closely with planners to improve health equity by making healthy destinations more accessible. A “Reaching People with Disabilities Through Healthy Communities” grant from the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors provided important technical assistance for ensuring that the development process and resulting system were accessible to all. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation?  How to create a way finding system that creates greater access to healthy nutrition, physical activity and health care for people of all ages and ability. How to modify a community assessment process to ensure that input is not limited to the usual “suspects/stakeholders”. How to create a more inclusive process. The value of involving a varied group of stakeholders, especially planners and people with disabilities, in creating community policy, system and environmental changes. 

Why are these lessons important?  Designing environmental changes and policies that are inclusive creates a community that works for everyone, we all benefit in the short and long term

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home?
*A couple of new spins on data gathering (adapted wikimapping and focus group processes)
*A unique method to build sustainable, engaged coalitions
*Ways to make a way finding system more usable by people with disabilities 

Objective(s):

To describe how to create a way finding system that creates greater access to healthy nutrition, physical activity and health care for people of all ages and ability.
To identify two community assessment tool modifications to ensure a more inclusive process.
To define a new technique for building a capacity of coalition members. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Analytic/Assessment
Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication
Cultural Competency



 

 

 
 
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