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Agenda w desc September 19
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2017 MPHA Annual Meeting and Conference-

Agenda September 19, 2017

 Click on the title to be taken to a description of the presentation
   Welcome
 9:00 - 10:00 AM Public Health: What’s in it for me? What’s in it for my community? - Greg Holzman, State Medical Officer
10:00 - 10:30 AM  Break with Refreshments- Atrium
 10:30 - 11:30 AM Public Health and Hospital Collaborations for Community Health Planning -  Panel
 11:30 -11:45 AM  Transition break
 11:45 - 12:45 PM Tobacco 21 and other policies to prevent youth from being targeted by Big Tobacco- Panel
 12:45- 2:00 PM Public Health Nurse Section Luncheon-

-          "How to wear several hats & passing on a motivational message of hope"

 2:00 - 3:00 PM  Invest Health Missoula: Cross-Sector Collaboration to Address Social Determinants of Health- Panel
 3:00 - 3:15 PM  Transition Break
 3:15 - 4:15 PM  It's the Journey Together That Matters - Gary Gunderson, VP Faith Health and Professor Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University
 4:45 - 5:15 PM  River Walk
 4:45 - 5:45 PM  Cocktails
 5:45 PM  Awards Banquet
  

Descriptions of Keynotes and Breakouts- September 19, 2017

9:00 – 10:00 AM   Keynote        

Public Health: What’s in it for me? What’s in it for my community?-  Greg Holzman State Medical Officer

In today’s environment of information overload, increasing technology, virtual communities and greater specialization – actual people and real communities have faced new and growing challenges. This has affected us personally and professionally – however, it has not changed our mission within public health. To meet our mission in today’s world different tactic, new objectives and changing job descriptions might need to occur. We will start this conversation, as public health professionals and concern citizens, about how best to adapt to help build and sustain healthy people living within healthy communities. 

Objectives:

(1) The Presentation shall define the purpose of public health with highlighting examples of both historical and current public health issues
(2) Participants will better understand how a clear focus on the overarching goals of public health will improve our communities and likely increase one’s own enjoyment in their work.
(3) We will discuss ways to increase coordination, cooperation, collaboration and, at times, even integration to improve the health of our communities
(4) Examples of current public health issues will be raised and possible next steps within Montana discussed
(5) The presentation should spark conversation on why, how, what and where public health can help foster partnerships and build strong collaborative models to continue to improve health among all Montanans. It is the speakers hope that the conversation started with this presentation will continue throughout the conference and the coming years as we work to strengthen our public health systems for the challenges of today and in the future. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning
Communication
Leadership and Systems Thinking 

          


10:30 – 11:30 AM  Breakout 

Public Health and Hospital Collaborations for Community Health Planning- Panel

This hour will contain a panel of three different jurisdictions who will each discuss the successes, challenges, and lessons learned during collaborative community health planning efforts. Audience will have time to ask questions of the panel.

What primary lessons can learners take away from the presentation? Best practices and lessons learned around collaborative efforts between public health and primary care for community health planning. 

Why are those lessons important to learners? Public health and primary care are both tasked with completing community health planning, so any lessons learned, successes and challenges will help other jurisdictions with their collaborative efforts. 

What tools will learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Real world examples of how to collaborate with primary care around community health planning.

Objectives:

Describe examples of best practices and lessons learned between public health and primary care for collaborations on community health planning 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Community Dimensions of Practice
Public Health Science
Leadership and Systems Thinking

 


11:45 AM – 12:45 PM Breakout

Tobacco 21 and other policies to prevent youth from being targeted by Big Tobacco- Panel

This panel presentation will focus on the tactics used by the tobacco industry to target youth in Montana and the emerging strategies and policies to limit the sale, display, and advertising of tobacco products in the retail environment. Specifically, the presentation will highlight Tobacco 21, a policy that increases the minimum legal sale age (MLSA) for tobacco products from 18 to 21. Panelists will discuss the benefits of increasing the MLSA, including reducing underage sales, delaying the age of initiation, keeping tobacco out of schools, and reducing overall tobacco use. The presentation will also touch on other policies that can be put in place to restrict tobacco’s marketing towards youth, such as product placement and flavor restrictions. Panelists are to be determined, but will likely consist of a physician, legislative representative, attorney and tobacco program staff. 

What primary lessons can the learner take away from the presentation
1. The Tobacco Industry is targeting youth with candy-like flavors, strategic placement of products, price discounts, and colorful packaging.
2. There are mechanisms to protect vulnerable populations from being targeted by the tobacco industry, such as prohibiting the sale of flavored products, requiring all products to be placed behind the counter, and restricting sales coupons.
3. Tobacco 21 (increasing the MLSA to 21) delays initiation, keeps tobacco out of schools, reduces underage sales

Why are these lessons important?  The above mentioned lessons are important because, unfortunately, the tobacco industry’s marketing tactics work. Research shows that 70% of children visit convenience stores weekly and the odds of smoking are more than doubled for teens who visit stores with tobacco ads at least twice a week. The good news is policies that make it difficult for youth to obtain tobacco products also work. We know that about 95% of adult smokers begin smoking before they turn 21.

What tools will the learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Attendees will receive information on how to spread the awareness of the Tobacco Industry’s tactics to target youth and hook a new generation of lifelong users as well as the policies that can be put in place to protect youth. 

Objective(s):

Discuss how the Tobacco Industry targets youth with their products and the emerging policies (specifically Tobacco 21) that can be put in place to protect youth and improve public health. 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning 

 


2:00 – 3:00 PM  Breakout

Invest Health Missoula: Cross-Sector Collaboration to Address Social Determinants of Health- Panel

Invest Health Missoula is a partnership of city government and non-profit organizations working to improve health equity by making connections between the health care sector and the community development sector. Supported by funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Reinvestment Fund, team Missoula is one of 50 teams from mid-sized cities across the country participating in this 18 month project that started in July of 2016. The goals of the initiative are to bring together disparate sectors, use data as a driver for change, advance systems-focused strategies, test potential solutions, attract capital, and build lasting relationships. Hear from United Way of Missoula County CEO Susan Hay Patrick and NeighborWorks Montana Assistant Director Kaia Peterson as they discuss their experience as part of this team. They will share how they are creating a team approach, defining a shared vision, integrating shared systems, engaging community residents and stakeholders, and influencing decision making across sectors. 

What primary lessons can learners take away from the presentation? The challenges and rewards of collaborative partnerships; Key elements of developing teams that work; Some of the most promising opportunities for collaboration between healthcare and other sectors 

Why are those lessons important to learners? With the increasing focus on up-stream solutions to improving health outcomes, we need to look outside the traditional health care sector for the resources and skills it will take to address these complex health needs in our communities. 

What tools will learners receive to apply what they have learned when they return home? Health equity framework and resources being advanced by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation helping to make the case for this work, data and mapping tools, team and collaborative approaches. 

Objectives:

To understand collaborative health solutions 

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Policy Development/Program Planning
Cultural Compentency
Community Dimensions of Practice
Leadership and Systems Thinking


3:15 - 4:15 PM Keynote

Its the Journey Together that Matters- Gary Gunderson, VP Faith Health and Professor Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University

Exploring the ways in which those of us working to advance the health of the public are learning to speak with, of and to the full breadth of the people who make up the public. The heart of the work is the heart that drew us into the work in the first place--being with the people and the places we love. More important that what exactly we say is why we are in dialogue about the things that matter most to the public we care about. 

Objectives:

To review the Moral Foundation Theory of Jonathan Haidt.
To review and become familiar with the Leading Causes of Life framework guiding the boundary-spanning practices underway in North Carolina
To review the body of practices emerging in other highly diverse communities in which Public Health stands among

Core Competencies for Public Health:

Communication
Cultural Competency
Community Dimensions of Practice
Leadership and Systems Thinking


 


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